Monthly Archives: July 2015

Raisin’ the Roof

Here it is, another month gone by. And boy have I made progress!

Right now I am looking for roofing and siding materials, flooring, and plumbing and electrical materials. Please let me know if you have any or can point me in the right direction!

After the first couple of heavy rains that soaked my house inside and out, my parents and I gathered up the plastic reclaimed from the winter barn extension to make a skirt around the bottom and cover the window openings. This worked out quite well. Glad we had the plastic sheeting!

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I finished the roof a little over three weeks after I pulled my house out of the barn. The mini extension walls were fairly quick and easy – I felt a lot more confident building them than I had with the first main walls. I was able to build them in two afternoons mainly on my own. Fun!

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Putting them up was a bit tricky because it was up high, but having the loft and bathroom wall there to stand on was really convenient. Built in scaffolding! The frustrating part was having to shave the walls down to the right length, making them fit perfectly instead of being 1/8″ to 1/2″ too long. It was hard to just build them right to start with because the rafters they were fitting up next to were a bit warped. Also it was hot, so lifting the walls up and down was a bit tiring. In the end, we made it work, just like we always do.

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CJ was here for a couple days and helped out with insulating and putting the plywood sheathing onto the roof. It was messy and there was a lot of trial and error. Having the roof insulated and sheathed felt really good, though! Even if we were trying to beat the rain and just tacked the plywood down until I could finish fastening it later.

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Then it was time to frame the lower pitched roof! We started with the triangle walls where the pitch-change happened. It was not a right triangle and I had to summon some more geometry skills. I was very happy to be done framing those suckers… there was a lot of adjusting and awkward angle hammering involved. When we’d finished framing those, the rest of the rafters were ready to be screwed in. It went fairly quickly and soon we were able to start putting ceiling material up. Holding and hammering plywood to rafters at that angle was extremely tiring and frustrating, especially in the corners. We made a mess of the paint job, so it’s good I was already planning on touching it up later.

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The end wall went up in an afternoon and I was able to do it mostly on my own. After it went up, we finished the last little bit of ceiling. Unfortunately though, we’d done something funky with the frame of the skylight. We adjusted the pair of rafters connected to it to be the right distance away from the previous rafter pair. Because we built the rough opening square, shifting the tops of the rafter pairs brought it out of square. We didn’t realize this until we had such trouble putting the rest of the ceiling on. I got frustrated and grumpy about it, but the next day we figured out a fairly quick way to fix it that didn’t involve undoing the last few days of work! With a little bit of sawing and shifting, the opening was brought back to square and all was okay. I don’t have any pictures of that mistake stage, though, because I was too bummed out when we discovered it.

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My dad helped me put up the 1/4″ on the end wall and nail it on. Then I routed it out.

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Then it was time to slip the insulation in, spray foam to seal it, and sheath it!

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Cruising right along, the skylight went up! My very first window, screwed in and secure. After installing it, I put Grace ice and shield sticky tar roof underlay stuff on the roof around the skylight. I was able to put it on in the evening, which ended up being perfect. It was tricky enough managing the sticky underlayment without it having been melting in the sun in the middle of the day (and therefore even stickier). Now it’s weatherproof enough until the actual roofing material goes up!

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Finally, I pulled the tarp off the roof for good, finished securing the plywood sheathing on with nails (working on my ambidexterity when convenient), and then put the rest of the Grace ice and shield and some tar paper. I was wearing my climbing harness hooked on to a rope for hammering all over the roof so I wouldn’t get badly hurt if I fell. I also stood on a couple of temporary 2x4s nailed onto the roof. It was NOT comfortable sitting on the peak of either roof (but especially the 12/12 pitch) and I was very happy to come down when I’d finished with the tar paper over the peak. When the tarp came off, I realized I hadn’t seen the whole thing yet with all roofs built and all. Very exciting!

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I enjoyed my first lunch in my home, and Jasper appreciated the 2×4 ramp leaned (accidentally) against the sill of the door.

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More soon!!